Chrissy Rutherford's Path To Finding and Forwarding Joy

Chrissy Rutherford's Path To Finding and Forwarding Joy

11/19/2021

Starting over—in the midst of a pandemic, nonetheless—is a profoundly daunting task. But, Chrissy Rutherford's journey of self-discovery over the past year and a half has revealed not only that it's possible but that sometimes leaping into the unknown is a necessary step. After leaving her coveted editorial role in February 2020, she moved into content partnerships with brands and, in June of last year, co-founded 2BG Consulting. Part of the agency's critical work is to advise fashion and beauty brands and influencers on implementing anti-racist strategies. Chrissy's work hasn't stopped there—in January of this year, she launched her newsletter, FWD JOY. There, she shares her mental health and well-being strategies, and highlights the things that bring her joy at the moment. We recently had a chance to sit down with Chrissy to talk about her self-healing, her career path through the fashion, magazine, and now consulting worlds, the updates she's made to her family home since she's moved back, and the work ahead for her agency. Read below for more.

Fashion and social media consulting, contributing writer, content creator—you've done it all. Tell us about how you got your start in the New York fashion scene and your path to define your career on your terms. 

I always knew I wanted to work in fashion, so I got an internship at Harper's Bazaar in the fashion closet. It was everything I dreamed of and more—it solidified that I would pursue a career in editorial. However, I graduated the year the recession started, so I took freelancing jobs at a multi-label showroom as a styling assistant until I finally found my footing in magazines again. I spent almost a decade as an editor—and in February 2020, I decided to switch gears a little bit and work on content partnerships with brands and started a consulting agency.

What were you trying to capture when refreshing your family room? 

That room was an addition to our house when I was in high school to give me extra space to do homework and not be trapped in my bedroom. The room was feeling a little outdated, and I had already freshened up my bedroom when I moved back home, so I proposed to my parents that we re-do the room.  

We love that you layered a few Lulu and Georgia pieces into your space. Is there one statement maker you still find yourself fawning over? 

The Lulu and Georgia pieces absolutely make the room. The green velvet sofa is obviously the star of the show. Previously in the room, we had green carpet and green walls, so I liked the idea of keeping that color in the room.

Personal trinkets and touches make a room—tell us about your favorite pieces in your living room?

There's this photograph of a waterfall in Jamaica that one of my dad's friends gifted to my parents when they first bought the house in 1988. My parents were both born in Jamaica, so I feel very connected to it even though I was born in New York. I also love all the books we've collected over the years. I'm a big reader, and so is my mom, and so was her mom—so they hold a lot of meaning for us.

Shop Chrissy's Living Room

What are your three tips for transitioning your space into the new fall season? 

I think heavier blankets—I love the Louis Vuitton logo one I received as a Christmas present from the brand a few years ago. And, switching up the pillows can always make such a difference to transition a room between seasons. Also, flowers always do the trick.  

How do you approach the decor of your home? Do you feel as though your creative work and your home style overlap?

So, I've never really felt like I was good at home decor or that I even really understood it. People always assume that if you love style and fashion, it transitions to interiors—but not in my case. I think I've learned a bit more since being back home. It's also much easier when you have more space to play with than my tiny NYC studio. But also working with Lulu and Georgia pieces, each one feels so sophisticated, so I really felt like I couldn't mess it up.  

 

How do you approach the decor of your home? Do you feel as though your creative work and your home style overlap?

So, I've never really felt like I was good at home decor or that I even really understood it. People always assume that if you love style and fashion, it transitions to interiors—but not in my case. I think I've learned a bit more since being back home. It's also much easier when you have more space to play with than my tiny NYC studio. But also working with Lulu and Georgia pieces, each one feels so sophisticated, so I really felt like I couldn't mess it up.  

How do you like to spend your free time when you're not working on 2BG Consulting or another project?

I read a lot, and I love going for walks in nature with my mom, talking on the phone with friends, journaling, and listening to music. 

Professionally, are there any projects that will always stand out for you?

Launching my newsletter FWD JOY at the beginning of 2021 was a huge feat for me. I've always loved writing, and having more space to write about my journey with mental health and how I take care of myself and prioritize my needs has been a really rewarding experience. 

What other creatives or mentors inspire you?

I'm inspired by so many who work to uplift Black women and keep pushing for us to be seen and heard—like Rachel Cargle, Ericka Hart, Sarah Diouf, Lindsay Peoples Wagner, and Nana Agymeng

What's next for you and 2BG Consulting? 

Last summer, when we launched, we started teaching an anti-racism workshop to help brands, influencers, and industry professionals see how racism functions in the fashion and beauty worlds. Earlier this summer, we developed a level 2 class, so we'll be teaching that to our brand partners—and we're excited to see how that keeps evolving as we want to help the industry see how nuanced this topic is. It's not just about adding more Black people to your office or your campaigns.

 

Photography provided by Chrissy Rutherford